The Spirit of Christmas

As little children we are told of Santa Claus and get excited each year to think he is watching and we try our very best to be good little boys and girls.  Seeing a child’s excitement Christmas morning when presents appear under the tree and the cookies they left out the night before are eaten and milk has vanished.  Somewhere along the way as we grow into young adults, the mystery of Santa disappears and we stop believing.  Why is this?  Why do we let this magic of Christmas disappear?  

I was speaking to my Grandson recently and learned he no longer believes in Santa and I was crushed.  What about the Spirit of Christmas?  He looked at me confused.  We talked for a while about what Christmas means and why we give gifts.  In our family, we believe in Jesus Christ and we celebrate his birth on December 25th. (Christmas!).  This my grandson is clear about, but the spirit of Christmas is the magic that as kids, Santa brings.  As adults, there is so much more to it.  This is where “Santa” transitions into the “Spirit of Christmas”.  This young time in our lives and into our adult years is when we learn,  and many times we forget, what all of the little traditions at Christmas are really for.  Why do we do all the things we do this time of year?  Santa is a great way to start telling small children about all of the traditions of Christmas, but let’s not forget to transition this wonderful belief to a more adult understanding as our kids grow.  Don’t let them lose the Spirit of Christmas, instead help them develop it into a magical feeling that they can lean on year round.  

The Colors Red and Green

The color red is used at Christmas to represent the blood of Jesus when he died on the cross.  Green is another popular color at Christmastime signifying everlasting light and life. Romans decorated their houses with evergreen branches during the New Year, and the fir tree symbolized life during the winter. There is also a legend that when Jesus was born in the dead of winter all the trees around the world shook off the snow to reveal new shoots of green.

The Bell

Bells are rung during Christmas to proclaim the arrival of the season and to announce the birth of Christ.

The Candy Cane

This treat represents the shape of a shepherd’s crook. Jesus, often referred to as the Good Shepherd, was born on Christmas. His birth was God’s way to bring lost lambs back to the fold. The red stripe represents blood, Christ’s sacrifice, and the white stands for his purity.

The Wreath

The wreath is a circular, never-ending symbol of eternal love and rebirth. Holly also stands for immortality and cedar for strength. Today the wreath symbolizes generosity, giving, and the gathering of family.

Gifts and a Bow

The men who brought their gifts to honor the birth of Jesus inspired the concept of giving gifts during the holiday.   A ribbon is tied around a gift to represent how we should all be tied together in bonds of unity and goodwill during the holiday season.

The Christmas Tree

Regarding the birth of Jesus, the Gospel of John records, “Light has come into the world.” Jesus himself said, “I have come into the world as a light, so that no one who believes in me should stay in darkness.” Surely, it is appropriate that our Christmas celebration be filled with light as we celebrate Jesus, the “light of the world.”

And what about Santa Claus himself?  here did the idea of “Santa” come from? 

A Brief history of Santa Claus

Santa Claus was a real man. He lived about 400 years after Jesus. He was the Bishop of a church. He loved Jesus. Bishop Nicholas had a friend that had 3 daughters, but they could not get married because their father did not have the money for their dowries.So late one night, in secret, Bishop Nicholas threw 3 bags of gold into their living room. The bags landed in socks that were drying by the fireplace(thus the tradition of stocking hung by the fireplace). Later the Catholic Church made him a Saint, thus Saint Nicholas. The Santa Claus that we know today in America is a result of Clement Moore’s poem, The Night Before Christmas, written in the mid 1800’s.

Holiday Cheer Challenge

Winter is here, Thanksgiving has come and gone and Christmas (or Hanukah or Kwanza) is at the forefront of every mind right about now.  But why do we celebrate these Holidays?  I can’t speak for Hanukah or Kwanza as I am truly not that knowledgeable on either, but I can speak about Christmas.  This is a season of giving and family.   Whether you are a religious or spiritual person or not, this description pretty much fits the bill.  For those a bit more spiritual, it is a time of celebration and reflection.  A time to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.  No, I’m not going to get super religious in this blog, not to worry.  I simply want to point out that however you celebrate and for whatever reason, a general basis world wide is that this season is about family, giving, sharing, and love.  (Insert the holiday song Peach on Earth…  in fact, turn on your Christmas music!)

I would like to generate a Holiday Cheer Challenge.  For the rest of the month, I challenge myself and all of you reading this blog, to promote Holiday Cheer each day for the rest of the month.  I am a huge fan of making every day a happy day and sharing your happiness with the world.  By doing a Random Act of Kindness, being a secret Santa, making a conscious effort to pay it forward daily, I am positive you will find that your heart grows daily and by helping others, you will be filled with a little more peace and happiness in your soul.

Take a moment and think of a few ways you can do this:

  1. Random Acts of Kindness (these are always fun and usually super easy when you extend the olive branch to help a stranger)
  2. Become a Secret Santa.  This is fun to do in your home with your family or even extended family or ignite the tradition in your workplace.
  3. Pay it forward.  Surprise the car behind you in the drive–thru line by paying for their lunch or cup of coffee.
  4. Get involved in your community.  Commit to volunteering for one or more charitable organizations this month.  There are so many opportunities for adult, kids or the whole family together to help organizations or participate in community events this holiday season.
  5. Be a greeter for a while.  This may sound strange, but try standing at your local store this month for about 10 minutes and just hold the door for guests coming in and out.  Wish them a happy holiday season and brighten their day.  It may sound strange, but how many times has a door been held for you when your arms are full of shopping bags and it really made you grateful for the help?
  6. Spend more time with your family (near and far).  Turn the television off, jump n the car and go look at Christmas lights.  Visit a local church to hear a living Christmas Tree.  (If you have never heard or seen one, they are breathtaking.)  Keep that television off and play a board game.  Write a note to a friend or family member each day wishing them a beautiful holiday season and new year.  (Sending out holiday cards is always a great time and reason to send a little hug in the mail).

There are countless ways to spread a little happiness and if we all did this for just this month, the world will be a little bit brighter and less stressful for all of us.  Who knows, it may become a tradition in your family or a habit you keep all year long.  This may sound trivial to some of you, but by taking a moment to stop and think of others daily, you will find a little renewed pep in your step.  (The trick is to do these tasks without expecting anything in return, truly share and give of yourself).

I hope everyone one is jumping into the Holliday this year with both feet.  In my humble opinion, there is no greater time to get into the habit of sharing and caring for others more than right now.  Wishing you all a beautiful and blessed holiday season and as always, have a happy day.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: